Lisa Kron's WELL is not a well-made play. But, contrary to what her lead character--that is, Lisa herself--may have you think, she doesn't want it to be. I saw it on Broadway during its limited run back in 2006, with the incomparable Jayne Houdyshell co-starring with Lisa as her mother. And for a play that was, by the author's own admission, all over the map - it was at once poignant, touching and a ton of fun. But not until I read it on the page did I realize how carefully constructed it was, and how she painstakingly developed it to implode in on itself in a way that seems chaotic to the audience but is actually delicately conceived. The structure of an autobiographical "theatrical exploration" getting constantly interrupted by the characters it was inspired by until it all collapses in on itself? Well, it's such a clever way to buck the solo show mentality; it's truly playwriting at its most smart and experimental. Lisa describes it best in her introduction: "...it becomes evident that both the form and the content of the play have all along been making room enough to allow life to spill over in all its contradictory messiness."

Devon Berkshire, associate director of conferences

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