Reading Will Eno’s work is a bit like getting together with that brilliant but strange friend we all have, who allows us to see the world through their own bizarre, kaleidoscopic lens for a brief while. While there are echoes of Beckett and Albee in his writing, Eno’s voice is also very much his own, blending unexpected humor with the pull of existential anxiety. He has a knack for elevating the mundane to levels of the transcendent, and his powers are on full display in The Realistic Joneses as he explores the lives of two couples who have recently become neighbors in suburbia. Troves of emotional complexity lie buried within conversations that, on the surface, seem trivial. Eno intuitively understands the way secrets, loneliness, and uncertainty have the power to create distance between people, but also, on occasion, how they can bring people closer together. This is a play that feels at once familiar and uncanny, as if you’ve walked into a room you’ve known all your life, but a single object has been removed, and you can’t figure out which one is missing. It’s alluring and unsettling, but you’ll come through the other side of it changed, and isn’t that what theatre is for?

Erin Salvi, publications associate

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