If you grew up as a Catholic school kid, you knew there was nothing more frightening than a nun walking down the hallway! By the time I started school at the age of six, the days of nuns wearing “penguin suits” were long over. But that did not stop the lone sister at my elementary school from constantly patrolling the halls, and threatening students with afterschool detentions filled with copying bible passages. Doubt is the story of Sister Aloysius Beauvier, the head of a Catholic elementary school, and her quest to bring order back to her kingdom after she believes a student has had a tête-à-tête with Father Flynn, the school chaplain. This story felt so relatable to me because the safe environment that Sister Aloysius Beauvier attempted to recreate at her school was one extremely similar to the one I knew for nine years. And the situations brought up so eloquently and truthfully in Doubt are ones that people can come across in any situation. How do we trust people? How do we know when to follow our instincts? What do we do when the world we know so well is changing rapidly? These are the questions that Doubt asks of each of us. And even though Shanley does not answer them all, I think that is the point. The show leaves so much up to the imagination because it begs the audience to make the decision to trust people or not, to doubt ourselves or not. And by doing that, maybe we won’t have to be so fearful to raise questions the next time something does not feel right.

Megan Wrappe, American Theatre intern

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